The 2017 OIG Work Plan – Areas of New Focus In the New Year

On November 10, 2016 the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General released its 2017 Work Plan. The Work Plan, which is updated annually, furnishes key guidance to providers, suppliers, and others doing business in the health care industry regarding audit and enforcement activities that will be focused upon by the agency in the upcoming year. Providers should therefore be diligent in ensuring that their compliance programs and scheduled audit activities encompass these areas of focus. The following is a summary of some of the key new areas of focus identified in the Work Plan for Part A and Part B Medicare services. Unlike in some prior years, there does not appear to be one new area of emphasis by the OIG but rather the identification of a few select focused new items of interest that it has added to its Work Plan. In addition to these new areas, the OIG has maintained in its Work Plan several other areas of focus that it will continue to work this year.

Hospitals

  1. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Services – Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy involves giving a beneficiary high concentration of oxygen within a pressurized chamber. Given that HBO therapy is primarily an adjunctive treatment for the management of select nonhealing wounds, CMS Publication 100-03, National Coverage Determinations Manual, Ch. 20, § 20.29(A) requires a beneficiary meet 1 of 15 covered conditions for providers to receive reimbursement. In the past the OIG has reviewed such claims for medical appropriateness, sufficient documentation and noncovered conditions. The OIG intends to reemphasize its efforts in assessing whether reimbursement was in accordance with Federal requirements.
  2. Incorrect Medical Assistance Days Claimed by Hospitals – The OIG will be reviewing Medicaid patient days to determine whether the Medicare administrative contractors have properly settlement Medicare cost reports for disproportionate share hospitals (DSH) that have received Medicare DSH payments to ensure compliance with all Federal requirements.
  3. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Outlier Payments – From FY 2014 to FY 2015 the number of claims with outlier payments increased by 28 percent for Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities providing active psychiatric treatment to meet the urgent needs of those experiencing an acute mental health crisis, which may involve mental illness or alcohol- or drug-related problems. In terms of Medicare payments for such stays, the total outlier payments have increased from $450.2 million to $534.6 million. OIG intends to determine whether these facilities have complied with Medicare documentation, coverage and coding requirements for stays resulting in outlier payments.
  4. Case Review of Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospital Patients Not Suited for Intensive Therapy – In a separate medical review seeking to identify adverse events in inpatient rehabilitation hospitals, physician reviewers found a small number of cases in which patients appeared to be unsuited for intensive rehabilitation therapy. This study will assess a sample of rehabilitation hospital admissions to determine whether the patients participated in and benefited from intensive rehabilitation therapy for their illness, injury or surgery. For those identified as not suitable candidates, the reviewers will identify reasons why.

Nursing Homes

  1. Nursing Home Complaint Investigation Data Brief – The OIG will be reviewing the diligence with which State agencies are investigating complaints categorized as “immediate jeopardy” or “actual harm” within the applicable timeframes called for under the law at nursing homes.
  2. Skilled Nursing Facilities – Unreported Incidents of Potential Abuse and Neglect – The OIG will be assessing whether there are incidences of abuse and neglect at Skilled Nursing Facilities that are going unreported. The OIG will be looking for evidence that incidents were properly reported and investigated per Federal and State requirements.
  3. Skilled Nursing Facility Reimbursement – Skilled Nursing Facilities must periodically assess their patients using the tool called the Minimum Data Set to classify each patient into a resource utilization group for payment. Medicare reimbursement is tied to the activities of daily living and therapy received by each beneficiary and reported on the Minimum Data Set. The OIG will be reviewing documentation at selected SNFs to determine if the requirements for each particular resource utilization group is accurate.
  4. Skilled Nursing Facility Adverse Event Screening Tool – The OIG will be assisting in rolling out the Adverse Event Screening Tool in coordination with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. The goal of the product is to disseminate practical information about the tool for use by those involved with the skilled nursing industry.

Hospices

  1. Medicare Hospice Benefit Vulnerabilities and Recommendations for Improvement – The OIG has identified vulnerabilities in payment, compliance and oversight as well as quality-of-care concerns that directly impact beneficiaries of these services. The OIG will be making recommendations for protecting beneficiaries and improving the program.
  2. Review of Hospices’ Compliance with Medicare Requirements – A review of hospice medical records and billing documentation will be conducted to determine whether Medicare payments for hospice services were made in accordance with Medicare requirements.
  3. Hospice Home Care – Frequency of Nurse On-Site Visits to Assess Quality of Care and Services – A review will be conducted to determine if hospice nurses were performing the requirements on-site visits to the homes of Medicare beneficiaries receiving hospice care at least once every 14 days to assess quality of care and services provided by the aid.

Home Health Services

  1. Comparing HHA Survey Documents to Medicare Claims Data – The OIG is concerned with identifying potentially unqualified or fraudulent providers. Home Health Agencies are required to supply patient information to State agencies and thus a determination will be made as to whether HHAs are accurately providing patient information to State agencies for recertification surveys.

Medical Equipment and Supplies

  1. Part B Services During Non-Part A Nursing Home Stays: Durable Medical Equipment – If a beneficiary resides at a SNF after 100 days, Medicare Part B may provide coverage for certain therapy and supplies (non-Part A stay). However, a 2009 OIG report found that Medicare Part B allowed inappropriate payments of $30 million in 2006 for durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies during non-Part A stays in SNFs. This new study will determine the extent of inappropriate Medicare Part B payments for such items during non-Part A stays in 2015.
  2. Medicare Market Share of Mail-Order Diabetic Testing Strips – The OIG will be releasing its required reporting on the market share of diabetic testing strips in anticipation of the next round of the competitive bidding program.
  3. Positive Airway Pressure Device Supplies – Beneficiaries routinely receive replacements of continuous positive airway pressure or respiratory assist device therapy (PAP) when they wear out or are exhausted. Previously the OIG had discovered that equipment was being shipped when no physician order for refills were in effect. The OIG will be investigating whether claims for frequent replaced PAP device supplies were properly documented as medically necessary along with ensuring frequency of replace and other Medicare requirements are being met.

Prescription Drugs

  1. Drug Waste of Single-Use Vial Drugs – The FDA approves vial sizes for single use submitted by manufacturers but does not control the vial sizes submitted for approval. A study will be conducted to determine if savings might be realized if smaller single use vial sizes were utilized here in the United States as is done in other countries.
  2. Potential Savings from Inflation-Based Rebates in Medicare Part B – Each year statutorily mandated rebates enable Medicaid to recoup substantial portions of the billions spent on prescription drugs. In contrast, Medicare Part B similarly spends billions annually but has no similar rebate. The OIG will perform a sample study to calculate how much the Federal Government could potentially collect from pharmaceutical manufacturers if similar rebates were required for Part B.

The Work Plan also contains new endeavors relating to other Providers and Suppliers such as Diagnostic Laboratories, Transitional or Chronic Care Management and Ambulance Services.

In addition to Medicare Part A and Part B, the OIG will be implementing new focuses for Part C and Part D services as well. They include the following new initiatives:

Part C – Medicare Advantage

  1. Medicare Part C Payments for Service Dates After Individual’s Date of Death – CMS pays MA organizations for Part C benefits prospectively. A prior OIG review determined that Medicare improperly made $23 million in payments in 2011 for deceased beneficiaries of which $20 million was directly related to Part C payments. The OIG will therefore be examining if payments made after a beneficiaries’ date of death were in accordance with Medicare requirements.
  2. Extent of Denied Care in Medicare Advantage and CMS Oversight – Capitated payments, as used by CMS to pay MA plans, can result in financial incentives for plans to underserve beneficiaries. A review will be conducted to assess the extent to which inappropriate denials are occurring.

Part D – Prescription Drug Program

  1. Medicare Part D Rebates Related to Drugs Dispensed by 340B Pharmacies – The OIG will assess potential savings if pharmaceutical manufacturers paid rebates for drugs dispensed through the Medicare Part D program but at 340B covered entities and contract pharmacies.
  2. Questionable Billing for Compounded Topical Drugs in Part D – Part D spending for compounded topical drugs grew by more than 3,400 percent between 2006 and 2015. The OIG will be investigating the potential fraud risk given this sharp increase in spending and identifying pharmacies with questionable Part D billing for these drugs and any associated prescribers.

A review of the full Work Plan identifies a number of other areas to be reviewed by the OIG including review of the States’ operations of their Medicaid programs and the activities within the Health Insurance Marketplaces.

Not surprisingly, it will be another busy year for the OIG and its various audit, investigation and review bodies.