Month: November, 2017

CMS Issues The 2018 MACRA Quality Payment Program Final Rule

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) recently published the 2018 Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (“MACRA”) Quality Payment Program (“QPP”) final rule.  CMS maintained that it is listening to feedback and concerns from providers and that what it has heard is reflected in many of the provisions of the rule.

Among the many changes in the final rule are the following:

  • For 2018, CMS will exempt providers and groups with less than $90,000 in Medicare Part B allowed charges or that care for less than 200 Medicare Part B patients. These providers would be exempt from participating in the QPP altogether.
  • Small practices (those with fifteen or fewer practitioners) can earn five additional points to their Merit-Based Incentive Payment System final score if they submit data on at least one performance category. Further, CMS will award providers up to five bonus points if their patient population is deemed particularly complex, as measured by a combination of Hierarchical Conditions Category risk scores and the number of dually eligible patients treated.
  • Providers are allowed to continue using 2014 Edition Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (“CEHRT”), rather than upgrading to 2015 Edition technology, to report the Advancing Care Information (“ACI”) transition measures.  Providers that exclusively use 2015 CEHRT to report the ACI objectives and measures (the Stage 3 equivalent measure set) could be eligible for a ten percent bonus score.
  • The reporting period for quality performance, which was ninety days during 2017, which was the transition year, is now the full calendar year.
  • Solo practitioners and small practices can form a virtual group without specialty or location limitations to participate in MIPS.  While it was previously known that virtual groups would be an option, more detail on how those groups can be formed and can apply for treatment as virtual groups is now available.
  • CMS will implement a MIPS measurement option that allows hospital-based clinicians to use their hospital’s value-based purchasing results for the MIPS cost and quality categories.  However, this option will not be available until calendar year 2019.
  • Providers will be assessed on cost measures for 2018.  This was originally a 2019 requirement under the proposed rule.  The cost category will be weighted at ten percent of the MIPS final score in 2018 and will increase to thirty percent in 2019.

The 2018 final rule is emblematic of CMS’ continued approach to tinker with MACRA’s obligations and burdens on providers of all sizes.  From the beginning, it has been clear that MACRA would be a work in progress that would evolve, especially in the early years.  Thus, it is important that providers continue to pay attention to additional MACRA-related rules to ensure that they are current on the latest requirements, especially those that may be beneficial.

Trump Provides Leeway to Employers to Withhold Birth Control Coverage

On October 6, 2017 President Donald Trump signed an executive order calculated to provide employers more opportunities in denying coverage concerning contraceptives. Under the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), most health plans are required to cover all methods of birth control approved by the Food and Drug Administration without charging women for them. Although religious employers and some private employers with strong religious objections are exempt, very few met the requirements and had to provide the contraception.

President Trump’s executive order officially opens the door for many companies or nonprofit organizations with religious or moral objection to contraception to stop offering it. The move has been long anticipated given the fact that President Trump issued an executive order on “religious liberty” in May 2017. Over 55 million US women have birth control coverage with zero out-of-pocket costs, according to the National Women’s Law Center. Moreover, according to the center, Obamacare saved women an estimated $1.4 billion on birth control pills alone in 2013. To further efforts against the executive order experts have relied on the fact that many women use contraception methods for more than pregnancy prevention. On the other side, Health and Human Services officials claim the new rule would have no impact on “99.9% of women” in the United States. The agency calculated that at most, 120,000 women would be affected: mainly those who work at the roughly 200 entities that have been involved in 50 or so lawsuits over birth control coverage.

Notwithstanding what the early headlines may have inferred, the executive order does not eliminate the ACA’s contraceptive coverage guarantee. This issue is the unknown factor of how many individuals will lose coverage because an employer will claim a religious or moral exemption. A 2015 study from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation estimated that 3% of all nonprofits and 10% of the largest nonprofits have been using the accommodation. There are more than 1.4 million nonprofits in the United States and thousands consist of hospitals, long-term care facilities, schools, and charities—are affiliated with the Catholic church, the hierarchy of which objects to contraception.

Time will tell whether these religious based nonprofits will continue to use the accommodation or whether they will instead actively deny contraceptive coverage to all of those employees, dependents, and students.