Say Goodnight To The Two Midnight Rule’s Payment Reductions

by Paul L. Croce

The Two Midnight Rule, which was introduced as part of CMS’ FY 2014 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (“IPPS”) rule, dictates that when a physician expects a beneficiary to require care that crosses two midnights and admits the beneficiary based on that expectation, Medicare Part A payment is generally appropriate.  Conversely, if the beneficiary’s hospital stay is expected to be less than a period spanning two midnights, payment under Medicare Part A is generally inappropriate.

Because CMS anticipated significant increases in expenditures as a result of the Two Midnight Rule, CMS exercised the Secretary’s “broad authority” under 42 U.S.C. 11395ww(d)(5)(I)(i) to impose a 0.2% reduction to the national capital federal rate in FY 2014 to offset the anticipated increase in expenditures.  That same reduction was applied to the national capital federal rate in FY 2015 and FY 2016 as well.

In connection with the adoption of the Two Midnight Rule numerous commenters questioned the validity of the Secretary’s prediction of increased expenditures, upon which the decision to reduce rates was based. However, CMS never addressed these comments in detail when adopting its final rule except to say that the reductions were an appropriate use of the Secretary’s statutory exceptions and adjustments authority.

Having not received an adequate response to their comments during the rule making process, numerous hospitals filed suit challenging the 0.2% reduction. Several of those suits were consolidated before the United States District Court for the District of Columbia under the caption Shands Jacksonville Medical Center, et al. v. Burwell, Consolidated Civil Case Nos. 14-263, 14-503, 14-536, 14-607, 14-976, 14-1477 (the “Shands Litigation”).

On September 21, 2015 the Court in the Shands Litigation found that the Secretary’s failure to disclose critical assumptions made by the actuaries who calculated the alleged increase in expenditures, which was relied upon to impose the 0.2% reduction, failed to meet the standards of the Administrative Procedures Act by depriving the public of a meaningful opportunity to comment on the proposed rule. As a result, the Court remanded the matter back to the agency for further proceedings regarding the adequacy of the 0.2% reduction.

After remand, CMS issued public notice of the basis for the 0.2% reduction and its underlying assumptions.  As a result of the comments received to that public notice, CMS eliminated the 0.2% reduction for FY 2017 in connection with the FY 2017 IPPS final rule.  Additionally, CMS adjusted the FY 2017 capital IPPS rate to effectively eliminate the impact of the 0.2% reduction to rates in previous years by implementing a one-time prospective adjustment of 1.006 in FY 2017 to the national capital Federal rate.

Despite implementing this adjustment, CMS denies any error and continues to maintain that “the assumptions underlying the 0.2% reduction to the rates put in place beginning in FY 2014 were reasonable at the time we made them in 2013.”  Nevertheless, whether CMS recognized its error, or felt compelled to make this change as a result of the Shands Litigation, the end result is the same for hospitals throughout the country.  They have been relieved of the burden imposed by the 0.2% reduction associated with the adoption of the Two Midnight Rule.