The Office of Inspector General and the Health Care Compliance Association Collaborate to Provide Guidance on Effective Compliance Programs

by John W. Kaveney

On March 27, 2017 the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) and the Health Care Compliance Association (“HCCA”) released a document called Measuring Compliance Program Effectiveness: A Resource Guide (the “Guide”). The Guide is the collaboration of forty compliance professionals and OIG staff that met in January 2017 to discuss ways to measure the effectiveness of a compliance program. Given the historically limited information provided by the OIG regarding compliance programs this document provides important insight to the industry regarding how to assess the effectiveness of a compliance program.

The Guide takes the basic seven elements of a compliance program and provides lists of individual compliance program metrics to consider in implementing each item. The areas addressed in the Guide including the following:

  1. Standards, Policies and Procedures, including policy/procedure access, accountability for their update and the quality of their content
  2. Compliance Program Administration, including the roles of those responsible, the culture fostered by the compliance personnel, incentives, evaluations and risk assessment based on staffing/knowledge base
  3. Screening and Evaluation of Employees, Physicians, Vendors and other Agents, including accountability, potential conflicts of interest, disclosures and proper screening protocols
  4. Communication, Education and Training on Compliance Issues, including proper training, communication and accountability
  5. Monitoring, Auditing and Internal Reporting Systems, including proper processes, risk assessments, proper monitoring and auditing and timely corrective action plans/remediation
  6. Discipline for Non-Compliance, including consistency, awareness and documentation
  7. Investigations and Remedial Measures, including proper guidelines, consistency, quality, process, documentation, timeliness, communication and competency

The Guide is cautious to point out that it is not a “checklist” of required items to be applied wholesale in assessing the effectiveness of a compliance program. Rather, the items are intended to serve as broad ideas of metrics for health care organizations to choose based upon which best fit their needs. The Guide even states that an attempt to use all or even a large number of the items in the Guide would be impractical and is not recommended. Thus, it is important for health care organizations to consult with their compliance department and legal counsel to assess which best fit their needs and assist in advancing the effectiveness of their compliance program. Factors such as the organization’s risk areas, size, resources, industry segment, etc. are all critical to the analysis of which items to utilize.