CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE HEALTH CARE PROVIDER IN A PRIVATE EQUITY DEAL

by Glenn P. Prives

As private equity investors continue to survey the market for health care deals, providers who were uncertain about their strategic plans or who had no plans are finding partners out there.  Entering into a private equity transaction may be a once-in-a-career move for a health care provider.  However, it is important for providers to give some thought to what they want to negotiate in such a deal before signing on the dotted line.

Here are some considerations for the health care provider in a private equity deal:

  • Type of Partner:  some private equity firms will be very hands-on managing the health care provider while others will provide capital, but otherwise play the role of passive investors.  Some firms will bring in a very experienced operations team to supplant or support current management.  Which type of partner do you want?
  • Strategic Plan:  some private equity firms may seek to use the platform to add on other providers of a similar nature to the platform provider, while others set their sights on multi-specialty platforms.  What is your strategic plan?
  • Liquidity Event:  the initial liquidity event may be structured to have a cash component and a rollover equity component.  There is no one-size-fits-all split between the two components.  While the firm may make an initial offer on such a split, the target provider needs to consider what split best suits its needs and desires.  That may start a debate amongst the various owners of a provider if the owners are in different stages of their careers.  Early and mid-career partners may want to put more into rollover equity including some, if the deal allows, into a “parent entity” that may have different strategic plans.  Late career partners may want a higher upfront cash liquidity event.
  • Post-Closing Compensation:  compensation post-closing for providers will undoubtedly look different.  Like the liquidity event, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to compensation.  These days, some compensation is likely to be productivity-based, and that is not unique to private equity backed transactions.  Once again, the split between productivity-based compensation and fixed compensation may spark a debate.  Early and mid-career partners may want more productivity-based compensation.  Late career partners may want a higher base salary.
  • Governance:  the platform provider will have representation on the governing board of the management company, but how much representation and voting rights depends upon the particular provider.  “Add on” providers may have to work harder to negotiate for board representation if that is important to the provider.

These are just a few of the considerations for health care providers exploring a private equity deal.  Certainly, there’s much more to be done before a deal can be struck.  It is, therefore, important for a provider to contemplate what is most important to the provider as this may be one of the provider’s biggest strategic moves in his or her career.