DSH UNCOMPENSATED CARE COSTS LITIGATION CONTINUES

On January 10, 2010, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) posted answers to frequently asked questions (“FAQ”) regarding disproportionate share hospital (“DSH”) audit reporting requirements on its website. In those FAQs, CMS indicated that revenues received from private insurance companies (FAQ 33) and Medicare (FAQ 34) for Medicaid eligible patients must be deducted from costs when determining “uncompensated care costs.”

As a result of the policies enunciated in these FAQs, a deluge of litigation was commenced. Numerous hospitals asserted challenges, in various courts across the nation, asserting that FAQs 33 and 34 were unlawful amendments to the existing regulations which made no reference to the inclusion of Medicare and private insurance payments in the calculation of uncompensated care costs.  Each court that has addressed the issue has found the FAQs invalid, and issued either preliminary or permanent injunctions prohibiting their enforcement, on the basis that CMS violated the Administrative Procedure Act (“APA”) by failing to properly adopt the policies embodied therein in accordance with the notice and comment provisions of the APA. See Texas Children’s Hospital v. Burwell, 76 F. Supp.3d 224 (D.D.C. 2014); New Hampshire Hospital Ass’n v. Burwell, 2017 WL 822094 (D.N.H. Mar. 2, 2017); Children’s Hosp. of the King’s Daughters, Inc. v. Price, 258 F.Supp.3d 672 (E.D. Va. 2017); Tennessee Hosp. Ass’n v. Price, 2017 WL 2703540 (M.D. Tenn. June 21, 2017); Children’s Health Care v. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Servs., 2017 WL 366758 (D. Minn. June 26, 2017).

Thereafter, on June 2, 2017, following a notice and comment period, CMS issued a final rule which incorporated the policies enunciated in the previously issued FAQs (the “Final Rule”). The Final Rule provides that uncompensated care costs “[a]re defined as costs net of third-party payments including, but not limited to payments by Medicare and private insurance.” 42 C.F.R § 447.299(c)(10)(i).

The adoption of the Final Rule, however, has not stopped the challenges to CMS’ policy. Since the Final Rule’s adoption, two additional courts have addressed the calculation of uncompensated care costs. These courts not only found that CMS’ failure to follow the notice and comment provisions of the APA made the policies in FAQs 33 and 34 unenforceable, they also held the Final Rule invalid because it contradicts the plain language of the Medicaid statute. See Missouri Hospital Ass’n v. Hargan, 2018 WL 814589 (W.D. Mo. Feb. 9, 2018); Children’s Hosp. Ass’n of Texas v. Azar, 300 F. Supp.3d 190 (D. D.C 2018).  

Both courts looked to the Medicaid statute, which states that DSH payments cannot exceed:

[t]he costs incurred during the year of furnishing hospital services (as determined by the Secretary and net of payments under this subchapter, other than under this section, and by uninsured patients) by the hospital to individuals who either are eligible for medical assistance under the State plan or have no health insurance (or other source of third party coverage) for services provided during the year. 42 U.S.C. § 1396f-5(g)(1)(A).

The courts found that the Medicaid statute’s reference to “payments under this subchapter” was a specific reference to payments made by Medicaid. Because the Medicaid statute makes no reference to subtracting any other payments made on behalf of Medicaid eligible patients (other than payments by uninsured patients) from the total costs incurred, the courts concluded that CMS exceeded its authority in adopting the Final Rule.  Accordingly, the Missouri Hospital Ass’n court enjoined the enforcement of the Final Rule, and the Children’s Hosp. Ass’n of Texas court vacated the Final Rule in its entirety. Missouri Hospital Ass’n, 2018 WL at *10-13; Children’s Hosp. Ass’n of Texas, 300 F. Supp.3d at 205-211. 

In light of these court decisions, as of December 30, 2018, CMS has withdrawn FAQs 33 and 34 and will accept revised DSH audits that cover hospital services furnished before June 2, 2017, when the Final Rule was adopted.  Moreover, CMS has indicated it will not enforce the Final Rule as long as the decision in Children’s Hospital Ass’n of Texas remains in effect.  That decision is currently pending appeal before the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. We will be keeping a close eye on the Children’s Hospital Ass’n of Texas case and will provide an update once a decision is issued.