United States Department of Health and Human Services Pushes for the Elimination of Certificate of Need Laws among States in an Effort to Decrease Healthcare Costs

by Parampreet Singh

In December 2018, the United States Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) issued a report entitled “Reforming America’s Healthcare System Through Choice and Competition” (the “Report”) in which HHS recommended “state action to repeal or scale back Certificate of Need laws.”  This recommendation was motivated by HHS’s desire to decrease healthcare costs through competition, by allowing additional competitors into certain healthcare markets. 

Most states adopted Certificate of Need laws following the enactment of the Health Planning Resources Development Act of 1974 (the “Act”).  The Act required states to create agencies or programs to oversee the creation or expansion of healthcare facilities.  The enactment of the Act was motivated by the assumption that healthcare costs were rising due to the overbuilding of healthcare facilities.  Specifically, due to an abundance of hospitals and other healthcare facilities, these facilities were unable to fill their beds, resulting in fixed costs being met through higher charges to patients.  Therefore, under the Act, a Certificate of Need would only be issued following the demonstration of actual need or demand by the entity seeking to expand an existing facility or build a new facility.  

Congress repealed the Act in 1986 for various reasons.  To date, fifteen states have eliminated their Certificate of Need requirements altogether.  New Jersey continues to maintain its Certificate of Need requirements.  Furthermore, between 2011 and 2016, the items covered under New Jersey’s Certificate of Need laws increased from twelve (12) to twenty-six (26), placing it amongst the top five most restrictive states when it comes to issuing a Certificate of Need. 

Based on the Report, Certificate of Need laws, in actuality, impose costs, including loss of beneficial competition; fail to improve healthcare quality or access; and foster unintended competition problems.  According to the Report, repealing Certificate of Need laws leads to “greater competition [which] incentivizes providers to become more efficient” and “hospitals faced with a more competitive environment have better management practices.”  Further, “evidence suggests [Certificate of Need] laws are ineffective,” and “[t]here is no compelling evidence suggesting that [Certificate of Need] laws improve quality or access, inefficiently or otherwise.”  Lastly, Certificate of Need laws impose costly barriers to provider entry and interfere “with market forces that normally determine the supply of facilities and services,” which can lead to the suppression of supplies, misallocation of resources, and shielding of “incumbent healthcare providers from competition from new entrants.” 

Since the publication of the Report, several states, including Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, and Alaska, have proposed legislation to either reduce the scope of Certificate of Need laws or to repeal them altogether.  Interestingly enough, moving in the opposite direction, Indiana has introduced legislation that would create a new Certificate of Need law. 

With legislators across the aisle concerned about the increasingly high costs of healthcare, and the Report’s arguments that Certificate of Need laws have been ineffective, the Report may serve as a catalyst to repealing individual Certificate of Need requirements in various states, including New Jersey.